Marijuana Policy Project

Limiting THC: States Are Trying to Ban High-Potency Weed

THC gets a bad rap. Its cannabinoid cousin CBD is all the rave because it doesn't get you high. Now lawmakers want to put limits on how high people can get on THC.

In Arizona, HRC 2045 would cap THC at 2% strength for all medical-marijuana patients. There are more than 200,000 such patients in the Grand Canyon State, which legalized medical use in 2010.

If passed, this amendment would be added to Arizona statutes:

A REGISTERED NONPROFIT MEDICAL MARIJUANA DISPENSARY MAY NOT DISPENSE TO A QUALIFYING PATIENT OR A DESIGNATED CAREGIVER MEDICAL MARIJUANA WITH A TETRAHYDROCANNABINOL CONCENTRATION OF MORE THAN TWO PERCENT.

In Florda, lawmakers are trying to cap THC at 10% strength for patients under 21. The amendment to health-care package HB 713 didn't pass in 2019, but did receive a favorable vote from the House on March 6. More then 265,00 patients have signed up since Sunshine State voters legalized medical use in 2016.

In Congress, Senator Mike Crapo (R-ID) has suggested adding a 2% THC limit to the SAFE Banking Act, which the House passed in September. He chairs the Senate Banking Committee.

The anti-pot group Safe Approaches to Marijuana has called for a 3% THC limit on all cannabis products.

"THC is not toxic at high doses like alcohol, nicotine or many other common drugs," says Dr. Mitch Earleywine, who's a psychology professor at SUNY Albany and a member of the NORML advisory board. "High-potency marijuana may actually minimize risk for lung problems because less [smoke] is required to achieve desired effects."

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Steve Bloom

Steve Bloom

Publisher of CelebStoner.com, former editor of High Times and Freedom Leaf and co-author of Pot Culture and Reefer Movie Madness.